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Scouting The Draft: Andrus Peat, OT, Stanford

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We're moving on quickly with our scouting profiles. Today we look at the outstanding guard from Stanford, who's a sure first round selection.

Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports

Andrus Peat has always come with a star rating, highly regarded as one of the best high school athletes in the country; a 5 star rating was a consensus by all recruiting outlets. He received over 30 scholarship offers to some of the finest programs in the country, eventually deciding to take the education and football advantages of playing at Stanford. Although he didn't start as a freshman (very few offensive lineman actually do through choice), he appeared in nearly next game and made the starting spot his own in the spring of his sophomore season.


There was a lot of hype surrounding Peat as he entered his junior season in 2014, and he didn't disappoint. He was named an all-American and was awarded the Morris Trophy, an award given to the best offensive lineman in the Pac 12 as voted for by coaches.


Throughout his time at Stanford, the Cardinals have been credited with having one of the finest offensive lines in the league. They consistently rank among the elite in terms of rushing yards and sacks allowed.


On Tuesday night, Peat confirmed that he would forego his senior season and enter the 2015 NFL draft, where he will likely be a first round selection.

Measurables


Height: 6'7
Weight: 316lb
Class: Junior
Hometown: Arizona

Positives

  • Size: If you're going to build an offensive tackle from scratch, he'll probably end up looking a lot like Peat. He's tall with good weight distribution; he has long arms, broad shoulders, thick thighs and a big butt.
  • Athleticism: Peat has excellent athletic ability and quick feet that enable him to mirror in pass protection and get out and block in space. I spoke to the guys at the Stanford blog and although they run mostly man blocking schemes, his skill-set will enable him to excel in zone as well.
  • Strength: One thing that jumps off the tape is his ability to really overpower his opponents with brute strength and power. He can be dominant in the run game clearing space up front and easily moving to the next level to block down on linebackers.
  • Pass Protection: I really like his technique when it comes to pass protection; he's light and balanced, gets set early and keeps his feet moving. He mirrored outside rushers with his nimble feet and used his frame to swallow anyone trying to power rush the quarterback. He's patient and waits for defenders to come to him; he doesn't jump and lose balance. He is technically very solid.
  • Run Blocking: I'm saving the best for last. I saw this on tape and it was validated by the Stanford blog, who confirmed that he can be flat out dominating in the run game. He drives with his legs and uses his rare athletic ability to open up lanes.

Negatives

  • Consistency: He plays too high at times and that may be attributed to his size. He can come off the ball with poor technique, even though 90% of the time his technique is exceptional. This can cause problems with stunts and losing balance and leverage, being forced back into the pocket.

Conclusion


When I watch Andrus Peat, I see a prototypical NFL left tackle in the making. There are a lot of things to love and not many things to hate. His length is impressive and he'll measure well at the combine in Indianapolis. He has the combination of speed, strength and balance that you'll want from a player protecting the blindside of your franchise quarterback. He's a first round prospect for sure and one of my favourite prospects in the draft. He should be a first round selection without a doubt and he could go as high as the top 5 or top 10. Washington at #5 would and should be in the market for some offensive line help.

Would I Draft Him For The Jets?


D'Brickashaw Ferguson is our left tackle in 2015. His skill-set has continued to decline, but cutting him is not an option. He's not even close to being one of our main problems. I wasn't that impressed with Breno Giacomini's game this year, but he again would cost too much to cut. Could we potentially push Breno inside to guard and start Peat out at RT? I don't think so; his size is a problem at the inside guard position. I think he'll be a very good player, maybe a great one, and if the Jets feel the same, they should draft him anyway, but I just can't see it.

Draft Grade: 85


90-100 = Exceptional Talent
80-90 = Impact Player
70-80 = NFL Starter
60-70 = Solid NFL Potential
50-60 = Draftable - Lot of work needed
>50 = Undraftable - Long Shot To Stick